Faculty Profile

Jamie Cross

Postdoctoral Fellow - Department of Economics

Publications

Zhang, Bo; Chan, Joshua & Cross, Jamie (2020)

Stochastic volatility models with ARMA innovations: An application to G7 inflation forecasts

International Journal of Forecasting Doi: 10.1016/j.ijforecast.2020.01.004

Cross, Jamie; Hou, Chenghan & Poon, Aubrey (2020)

Macroeconomic Forecasting with Large Bayesian VARs: Global-local priors and the Illusion of Sparsity

International Journal of Forecasting Doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijforecast.2019.10.002

A class of global-local hierarchical shrinkage priors for estimating large Bayesian vector autoregressions (BVARs) has recently been proposed. We question whether three such priors: Dirichlet-Laplace, Horseshoe, and Normal-Gamma, can systematically improve the forecast accuracy of two commonly used benchmarks (the hierarchical Minnesota prior and the stochastic search variable selection (SSVS) prior), when predicting key macroeconomic variables. Using small and large data sets, both point and density forecasts suggest that the answer is no. Instead, our results indicate that a hierarchical Minnesota prior remains a solid practical choice when forecasting macroeconomic variables. In light of existing optimality results, a possible explanation for our finding is that macroeconomic data is not sparse, but instead dense.

Cross, Jamie & Poon, Aubrey (2019)

On the Contribution of International Shocks in Australian Business Cycle Fluctuations

Empirical Economics Doi: 10.1007/s00181-019-01752-y - Full text in research archive

What proportion of Australian business cycle fluctuations are caused by international shocks? We address this question by estimating a panel VAR model that has time-varying parameters and a common stochastic volatility factor. The time-varying parameters capture the inter-temporal nature of Australia’s various bilateral trade relationships, while the common stochastic volatility factor captures various episodes of volatility clustering among macroeconomic shocks, e.g., the 1997/98 Asian Financial Crisis and the 2007/08 Global Financial Crisis. Our main result is that international shocks from Australia’s five largest trading partners: China, Japan, the EU, the USA and the Republic of Korea, have caused around half of all Australian business cycle fluctuations over the past two decades. We also find important changes in the relative importance of each country’s economic impact. For instance, China’s positive contribution increased throughout the mining boom of the 2000s, while the overall US influence has almost halved since the 1990s

Academic Degrees
Year Academic Department Degree
2017 The Australian National University PhD
Work Experience
Year Employer Job Title
2018 - Present BI Norwegian Business School Assistant professor