Building for the future

Trine Bratt Stølsnes


Marketing Director

Miris

Bachelor of Tourism Management

“The launch of Svart was a high-water mark. With the help of digital channels, the news reached over one billion people in the first month.”

At property developer Miris AS, Trine Bratt Stølsnes puts new ideas of technology and sustainability on the map.

Quite randomly, Trine Bratt Stølsnes ended up in the IT industry, where she held various positions in marketing and communication. Today, she is Marketing Director for MIRIS AS, a Norwegian property developer combining corporate social responsibility and innovative technology to change the property industry.

Your work is focused around sustainability, have you always had that interest?
It has grown gradually, and has increased as I have gained more knowledge.

How does Miris’ sustainability work differ from that of other property developers?
MIRIS is a challenger who wants to revolutionize a traditional sector through innovative technological solutions. Our strength is collaboration. We work with solid and highly competent partners in all relevant sectors to develop new sustainable and innovative development projects.

What is the big challenge for the property industry?
It is widely known that the property industry accounts for a very large proportion of the world’s energy consumption and emissions, as much as 40 percent. So, the challenge is for companies to start using sustainable materials and smart technology.

And in two new projects, you show that it is possible to think differently?
We have two flagship projects. One is the Hotel Svart, which will become the world’s first energy-positive hotel. The second is Spark, where we will use surplus heat from data centres to provide energy to surrounding buildings.

With regards to marketing, what are you most proud of?
The launch of Svart was a high-water mark. With the help of digital channels, the news reached over one billion people in the first month. It triggered inquiries from Norwegian and international journalists, bloggers and others, and about 300 articles have been written about it. We hit a nerve, and that was an overwhelming experience for a small company like ours.

What is your recipe for improving the world?
Every little bit helps. The new generations are more interested in the environment, which is crucial.