BI ranked as best business school in Norway

9 December 2019

Financial Times ranks BI as Norway’s best business school for the fifth straight year in a row in its yearly European Business School ranking 2019. BI ranks as number 36, up from number 37 last year, and remains the fourth best business school in the Nordic countries.

“This is one of the most prestigious rankings throughout the year as it demonstrates the quality and strength across many of our programs. It is a recognition of the solid work from the entire organization and a confirmation that BI is a top tier business school in one of the most comprehensive assessment of European business education,” says Inge Jan Henjesand, President at BI Norwegian Business School.Nye bilder Inge Jan Henjesand

FT’s business school ranking is a composite ranking based on the combined performance of Europe’s leading schools across the five main rankings of programmes published by the FT in 2019: MBA, executive MBA, Masters in Management (MiM) and the two rankings of non-degree executive education programmes.

Each of the program rankings measure the schools’ quality and the breadth of programmes on a number of indicators ranging from salaries, career progress, female faculty to international course experience and mobility.

“These assessments are important to all international business schools because they are frequently used by students, employers and businesses to compare schools and educational programs worldwide,“ says Henjesand.

This is the 16th edition of The Financial Times Business School ranking and BI’s third best results since its debut in 2010. HEC Paris tops this year’s ranking ahead of London Business School and SDA Bocconi.FT samlet 2019

About the ranking:

  • The European Business School ranking is a composite ranking based on the combined performance of Europe’s leading schools across the five main rankings of programmes published by the FT in 2019: MBA, executive MBA, Masters in Management (MiM) and the two rankings of non-degree executive education programmes.
  • A European schools rank is produced for each of these main rankings. MBA, EMBA and MiM account for 25 per cent each of each school’s total performance. For executive education, the scores obtained for customised and open programmes each account for 12.5 per cent.
  • The regional rankings measure the schools’ quality and the breadth of programmes. Schools must participate in all five rankings in order to be eligible for a full score. Schools that take part in only one ranking are eligible for a quarter of the total score.
  • An indexed score is created for each ranking. These scores are then added together, according to the weighting above, creating a combined total for each school.
  • This overall score is divided by the number of rankings in which a school features to calculate an average score — a derived measure of quality. This is added to the combined total score to generate a final score by which the schools are ranked.
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